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tv   Asia Business Report  BBC News  November 21, 2023 3:30am-3:46am GMT

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hello and welcome to asia business report. we begin with the chaos at openai where there's a growing rift between employees and the company's upper management. nearly all staff at the ai firm are threatening to walk if the company's former bosses are not reinstated. meanwhile, other tech industry giants seem to be trying to take advantage the growing discontent. cloud—based software firm salesforce as well as microsoft have both said they'd be willing to employ openai's researchers. our north america business correspondent erin delmore has the latest from new york. what began as the firing of openai ceo and co—founder sam altman on friday is now a stand—off between hundreds of open ai employees and the company board.
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nearly all of openai's workers are threatening to quit if the board doesn't resign and reinstate the former leadership. board members fired altman on friday saying in a statement that he was not consistently candid in his communications with them. the company also announced greg brockman, the president and co—founder of openai, would be stepping down as chairman of the board. but he quit. the company has named emmett shear, the co—founder of livestreaming platform twitch as openai's interim ceo. two prominent openai heads have signed on to the letter — chief technology officer mira murati and the firm's chief scientist, ilya sutskever. on monday morning sutskever tweeted that he deeply regrets his participation in board's actions. openai has been the dominant force in al development with its chatgpt chat bot. this episode is highlighting a split within the field of ai between those pushing for progress and those urging caution. meanwhile, microsoft has invested more
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than $13 billion in openai. it's quickly hired altman and brockman who will lead a new advanced ai research team. openai employees said in their letter microsoft had assured them that there were jobs for all. on monday, altman and brockman�*s hiring sent microsoft shares up 2%, hitting a record high for the technology giant. mr altman's forced exit from openai has sent shockwaves across the world of artificial intelligence. the technology's been making headlines since the company's chatgpt was made available to the public a year ago. since then, authorities around the world have been scrambling to understand the potential risks and benefits of ai. earlier i spoke to an ai researcher and scientist, margaret mitchell, who told me it all boils down to opposing views about how the technology should develop going forward.
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it's actually a bit of a conflict of values. so, openai is tied up in a lot of operationalising of different ethical values including things like safety and things like profit. so i think what we're seeing here is a bit of a value conflict between the board which has a charter to try and protect humanity long—term and then pulls for more short—term profit. all that's playing out right now. yes, there are some issues over the people who are working to commercialise the technology and the people who are working as you said for the nonprofit arm. can you just break that down for us? yeah, so basically openai has what is called a capped profit model which is the idea that you can only make a certain amount of profit because part of the initial idea behind openai was that it wouldn't be concerned about profit, it would focus on what would be best for humanity, what would make humanity most safe in interacting with
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artificial technology. and yet, they ended up hiring altman who does focus on things like commercialisation and profit, maybe at the expense of longer term thinking. so the board has one job to do in terms of the initial foundations of what openai is focusing on and at the same time that the company has a pull to be able to continue surviving, demonstrating that it can make something that's commercially successful. elon musk�*s social media company x is suing watchdog media matters for defamation. since last week, several major advertisers have left x amid a growing controversy about anti—semitism. last thursday, media matters said it had found that ads for major brands had appeared next to posts that touted nazism. meanwhile, in another blow to x, the white house has
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joined its rival threads which is owned by meta. the move which the white house says was in the process for several weeks, comes just days after the white house and others criticised musk for endorsing an anti—semitic post. the weekend saw a record number of domestic air travellers in india, breaking post covid air travel numbers according to figures released by the indian government. the bbc�*s arunoday mukharji is in dehli. what do the numbers tell us, arunoday? minister of civil aviation put out the post on x and said that air travellers on saturday amounted to over 450,000 on saturday and a similar number, in fact a little higher than that, on sunday,
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making it the highest number of consecutive day air travel on since the pandemic. that is why you are seeing the ministry of civil aviation go ahead and put this out in a statement itself because the government is pitching this is a major achievement after the pandemic as a civil aviation sector has been struggling and it is not just in india but across the world, since the pandemic. the post that he put out, in that, he also said india was well on track to becoming the world's largest civil aviation market. however, he didn't put a timeframe on the when or if that would happen but the reports we were tracking, india is slated to become the third—largest market 202a. despite that, challenges remain. along with the bright spots, these challenges will also have to be navigated if india wants to have a larger share of the global aviation market. �* ., ~ ~ .,
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market. arunoday mukhar'i in delhi, bringing i market. arunoday mukhar'i in delhi, bringing usi market. arunoday mukhar'i in delhi, bringing us the i market. arunoday mukharji in delhi, bringing us the latest. delhi, bringing us the latest on the air travel numbers. according to the world bank, an estimated 500 million women and girls around the world cannot get access to basic products and facilities to deal with menstruation. but one young woman from the uk decided to do something about it. sam everett reports. wherever there's poverty, there's period poverty and yet no—one talks about it. this is ella. during lockdown she started to sew reusable pads. and selling them to multiple girls and women in the world. people living refugee settlements who don't have the products they need, so they may leak through their clothes and because the stigma is so strong, they don't know who to ask or how to ask because they're so scared of talking about periods in the first place. three years later she has built a team of thousands of volunteers who so more than 100,000 pads and she has come to lebanon, one
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of the countries her charity the project helps. translation: here in our. region, women are ashamed to ask for pads. i'm still embarrassed, washing and drying them in the rooms so no—one else can see them. 60% of our pads have been disputed in lebanon and we found it so important to support the refugee community but also the national community. people do not have spare money and often it's the case between buying pads or putting food on the table, buying bread. translation: the cost of living is very high in lebanon. - the situation is dire. i reached a time during this crisis and i had to cut out clothes to use them as pads and provide pads for the girls. we tried other methods but they caused bad side—effects, allergies. these were better and healthier option. the charity has partnered with various organisations and women's centres to help distribute hygienic reusable pads in the area. translation: in the past i've had a lot to bite sanitary - pads.
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four or five dollars per month. translation: this saves us money as we have a lot - of payments nowadays, medicines, rent. they plan to form their own projects. we are having a workshop with ms ella. we can give this skill to the women in the community so they are able to also make these pads and use them for themselves and be able to sell them and make some. —— income. i experience really bad periods and every time i get a lot of cramps, it prevents me from doing daily activities. i have the privilege of having pads— i have the privilege of having pads and _ i have the privilege of having pads and medications i can't imagine _ pads and medications i can't imagine how they would be feeling _ imagine how they would be feeling. he had to give them a voice — feeling. he had to give them a voice we _ feeling. he had to give them a voice. we had to normalise it. -- we — voice. we had to normalise it. -- we had _ voice. we had to normalise it. —— we had to. another day they arrived, they shouldn't be a luxury. i want no—one to be ashamed to be speaking about their period. with an estimated 500 million people suffering from period poverty around the world, there is still a long way to go. we see the disproportionate effect poverty has on women and i really don't think
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that should be the case and if we can get these pads to as many as we possibly can then we can hopefully get rid of period property for people in lebanon and the world as well. before we go, us regulators are taking legal action against one of the world's largest cryptocurrency exchanges. the securities and exchange commission accused crack and of illegally operating as a securities exchange without first registering as such. —— kraken. that is all the time we have four on today's asia business report. thanks so much for watching. just a tractor spreading fertiliser on a field near canarvon. hang on, there is no driver! meet one of the first ai tractors in the uk. this was
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developed in the netherlands in large flat fields, not quite the terrain we have in many parts of north wales. so these students have been out to see what it can do for farmers here. they are particularly interested in how can compact the soil. i interested in how can compact the soil. ~ , ., , the soil. i think this would be really handy _ the soil. i think this would be really handy where _ the soil. i think this would be really handy where we - the soil. i think this would be really handy where we live. l the soil. i think this would be j really handy where we live. it will stop compaction and things with the winter coming now so you can go with the to more places. you can go with the to more laces. , .,. you can go with the to more laces. , .. ., places. this machine an excellent _ places. this machine an excellent machine. - places. this machine an - excellent machine. technology has changed much as the years have _ has changed much as the years have gone _ has changed much as the years have gone on and i'm sure this would — have gone on and i'm sure this would be — have gone on and i'm sure this would be great for farmers. it would be great for farmers. [it has would be great for farmers. has not would be great for farmers. it has not got to take over every operation _ has not got to take over every operation but _ has not got to take over every operation but it— has not got to take over every operation but it is— has not got to take over every operation but it is here - has not got to take over every operation but it is here for- operation but it is here for farmers— operation but it is here for farmers as _ operation but it is here for farmers as an _ operation but it is here for farmers as an aid - operation but it is here for farmers as an aid to - operation but it is here for farmers as an aid to make| operation but it is here for- farmers as an aid to make their life easier— farmers as an aid to make their life easier so— farmers as an aid to make their life easier so one _ farmers as an aid to make their life easier so one farmer- farmers as an aid to make their life easier so one farmer might| life easier so one farmer might be able — life easier so one farmer might be able to— life easier so one farmer might be able to run— life easier so one farmer might be able to run four— life easier so one farmer might be able to run four of- life easier so one farmer might be able to run four of these - life easier so one farmer might be able to run four of these ati be able to run four of these at the same _ be able to run four of these at the same time _ be able to run four of these at the same time and _ be able to run four of these at the same time and he - be able to run four of these at the same time and he can- be able to run four of these at. the same time and he can carry on doing — the same time and he can carry on doing other— the same time and he can carry on doing other things— the same time and he can carry on doing other things on- the same time and he can carry on doing other things on the i on doing other things on the farm — on doing other things on the farm. �* ., , farm. but while the farmer is away and _ farm. but while the farmer is away and it — farm. but while the farmer is away and it works _ farm. but while the farmer is away and it works by - farm. but while the farmer is away and it works by itself, l away and it works by itself, the developers stress it is safe. sensors will slow it down if anything comes anything near, stopping completely if
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something comes in the way. for more stories _ something comes in the way. for more stories across the uk, head — more stories across the uk, head to _ more stories across the uk, head to the bbc news website. shakira has reached a deal with a spanish court to settle a tax fraud case originally she faced
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potentially going to jail for eight years and a fine of £20 million if found guilty that she settled by paying the court a £6.5 million finejust she settled by paying the court a £6.5 million fine just before her trial was about to start stop she repeatedly denied any offence. next, everwondered why some of us get a headache afterjust why some of us get a headache after just a why some of us get a headache afterjust a small why some of us get a headache after just a small glass why some of us get a headache afterjust a small glass of red wine but are fine with other alcoholic drinks? welcome to the university of california sadie is basically due to a chemical in red grapes that can mess with how the body metabolises alcohol. and time now for ten seconds of the world's rarest big cat. this leopard is called frodo and he is loving his new enclosure at dartmoor zoo stock they have even signed him up to a dating site to help find him a new lady friend, if you know what i mean. i hope he gets plenty of swipes right. you are all caught up now. see you later.
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welcome to sportsday. coming up in the programme, no harry kane heroics this time. a frustrated england draw in north macedonia is the final round of
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qualification for euro 2024 continues. i will tell you about the impact of the football world cup in qatar had on the premier league last winter, as a new report finds injuries lasted longer and cost clubs more money. and it will be a new sport at the los angeles olympics in 2028. we will tell you about flag football and how it is growing in the uk. welcome along. thank you forjoining us. england's qualification campaign for next year's european championship in germany ended with an uninspired 1—1 draw in north macedonia. gareth southgate's side are still group winners — and the result ensures they'll be among the top seeds when the draw is made. but, as our football correspondentjohn murray says, it wasn't the way they wanted to sign off.

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